Rules for jewish dating

To fool oneself through this tactic is to lose control over oneself.

Romantic love is not always related to real love, especially when it ignores the true personalities and mutual interest of those involved.

In Vayikra Chapter 25 verse 17, the Torah commands: “And you shall not hurt (the feelings of) one another and you shall fear Hashem, for I, Hashem, am thy Lord.” Rav Hirsch explains that since the prohibition in an earlier verse (14) refers to hurting another financially, this verse cannot possibly mean the same.

Therefore, Rav Hirsch concludes that it is an extension of the prohibition of hurting someone in business dealings, which includes the prohibition of hurting someone’s feelings either by words or by deeds.

• You don't have to be Jewish to find favor in G-d's eyes • G-d gave only seven basic commandments to gentiles • Yiddish words for gentiles are goy, shiksa and shkutz • Judaism does not approve of interfaith marriage, but it is very common • Jews do not proselytize, but it is possible to convert to Judaism Judaism maintains that the righteous of all nations have a place in the world to come.

This has been the majority rule since the days of the Talmud.

To be ruled by one’s emotions and feelings, uncontrolled and undirected by logic, values and clear thinking, with no clear sense of goals and responsibility, is to ignore the only factors which can establish a firm foundation for a permanent and mature life-long relationship.

The theme repeated everywhere in novels and movies is that “I am in love and my love is beyond my control”; “I fell in love”; it was as though someone pushed me off a cliff and it was all accidental and unintentional.

The mindset in which we approach dating can be very telling of whom I am, rather than whom the person is that I am going to meet. Do we heed the words of Hillel: “what is unpleasant to you, do not do to another?The Jewish approach warns us not to “love in spite of yourself”, but to love “because of yourself”. Enter into the love relationship with your eyes open, not with your eyes closed.Don’t accept blind dates, unless you know who the potential partner is.The story goes on to say that the Jews were offered the Torah last, and accepted it only because G-d held a mountain over their heads! , the words generally translated as "at the foot of the mountain" literally mean "underneath the mountain"!) Another traditional story suggests that G-d chose the Jewish nation because they were the lowliest of nations, and their success would be attributed to G-d's might rather than their own ability.